2015
Atlas Catalan

The Greek philoso­pher Anax­i­man­der believed that the earth was bar­rel-shaped and that the inhab­it­ed world was on its flat top. He drew the very first map of the world, which looks like a flat round but­ton with a blue edge, the ocean. Three blue streams of water divide the world up into three almost equal parts. The map looks like the present-day logo of Mer­cedes Benz. In this map­pa mun­di, Anax­i­man­der brought togeth­er the con­ti­nents that were known in the sixth cen­tu­ry BC: Europe, Asia and Libya (a part of Africa). Any­one who has stud­ied the his­to­ry of car­tog­ra­phy will under­stand how dif­fi­cult it is to draw a map of the world based on expe­ri­ence alone.
Take, for exam­ple, the eight-vol­ume Cata­lan Atlas of 1375. The map fol­lows Mar­co Polo’s route and is rather like a medieval strip car­toon where, between the towns, cas­tles and criss-cross route lines, a car­a­van with camels walks around, two small naked men dive for pearls, a ser­vant with a rid­ing whip chas­es an ele­phant and emp­ty spaces are filled in with text. His book Il Mil­ione does attempt to pro­vide exact data about his jour­ney, but it still remains a guess for the geo­g­ra­ph­er, with indi­ca­tions such as a day’s jour­ney’, a day’s sail­ing’ or two days’ walk’. The atlas is a bril­liant fan­ta­sy of an unknown world.

The Unreliable World, about the work of Annesas Appel

The Greek philoso­pher Anax­i­man­der believed that the earth was bar­rel-shaped and that the inhab­it­ed world was on its flat top. He drew the very first map of the world, which looks like a flat round but­ton with a blue edge, the ocean. Three blue streams of water divide the world up into three almost equal parts. The map looks like the present-day logo of Mer­cedes Benz. In this map­pa mun­di, Anax­i­man­der brought togeth­er the con­ti­nents that were known in the sixth cen­tu­ry BC: Europe, Asia and Libya (a part of Africa). Any­one who has stud­ied the his­to­ry of car­tog­ra­phy will under­stand how dif­fi­cult it is to draw a map of the world based on expe­ri­ence alone.

Take, for exam­ple, the eight-vol­ume Cata­lan Atlas of 1375. The map fol­lows Mar­co Polo’s route and is rather like a medieval strip car­toon where, between the towns, cas­tles and criss-cross route lines, a car­a­van with camels walks around, two small naked men dive for pearls, a ser­vant with a rid­ing whip chas­es an ele­phant and emp­ty spaces are filled in with text. His book Il Mil­ione does attempt to pro­vide exact data about his jour­ney, but it still remains a guess for the geo­g­ra­ph­er, with indi­ca­tions such as a day’s jour­ney’, a day’s sail­ing’ or two days’ walk’. The atlas is a bril­liant fan­ta­sy of an unknown world.

The shape of the earth remained the sub­ject of wild spec­u­la­tion for a long time. Flat or round, or an oval with point­ed ends like a zep­pelin. Math­e­mati­cians racked their brains as to how a round shape could be expressed on flat paper. As ear­ly as the sec­ond cen­tu­ry, Ptolomeus fold­ed a piece of papyrus around a con­i­cal shape, drew on it every­thing that he knew about the earth and then fold­ed it flat. A map. He also intro­duced the merid­i­an, and lines of lon­gi­tude and lat­i­tude, and intro­duced a reg­is­ter of place names, with their coor­di­nates. He realised that direc­tion and dis­tance are the essence of each and every map.
Artists love maps, their sys­tem, the leg­end and the puz­zle of how things are rep­re­sent­ed. They usu­al­ly pro­duce a vari­ant of the real’ map in order to add their own truth to it. The sur­re­al­ists were shocked by the hor­ror of the first World War, and Paul Élu­ard rearranged the world in a map in which the pure’ cul­tures of the world were promi­nent­ly present and in which some World War I coun­tries were only just shown or had no place at all.

Maps and sys­tems also obsess the visu­al artist Annesas Appel. She began by mak­ing a jour­ney to the cen­tre of the com­put­er. Tak­ing her note­book apart result­ed in four books in which she clas­si­fied all of the com­po­nents accord­ing to a new sys­tem. She peels off lay­er after lay­er of the com­put­er. In the first part (decon­struc­tion), she copies each com­po­nent accu­rate­ly and gives it the same place on paper as it had in the com­put­er. Not by hand but in Illus­tra­tor on her new note­book. The sec­ond book (decode) shows the var­i­ous lay­ers of the cir­cuit boards. In the third book (writ­ing sys­tem), all the com­po­nents of the cir­cuit boards dance over the paper, in arrange­ments like the chore­og­ra­phy of a pol­ka dance with a pol­ka hop now and then: lines, sur­faces, imprints, cir­cles, dash­es, rec­tan­gles, squares, mis­cel­la­neous. Book four con­tains the index.
Just like the ear­ly map­mak­ers, Appel is try­ing to visu­alise some­thing that we do not under­stand. The unknown ter­ri­to­ry of the com­put­er works in the same way as the map­pa mun­di: the unknown is cap­tured, the com­po­nents stand in a free verse form, but as the observ­er we are bare­ly a step clos­er to under­stand­ing the work­ing or true nature of the thing.

In View on the World Map 04 (Enti­ties 2013), Appel presents her ver­sion of the world map, again in book form. She looked online for a map of the world and for Views on the World Map she came across a world map from the Bosat­las (the best-sell­ing atlas in the Nether­lands), where Europe is at the cen­tre. This is so famil­iar to us that we hard­ly realise that it is a choice; you could also take a map in which Jerusalem is the start­ing point, as the believ­ers did. Or Rus­sia. Annesas Appel fol­lows the West­ern tra­di­tion, in which each per­son sees him or her­self as the cen­tral point. On the ped­i­ment of the Roy­al Palace on the Dam, the four then known con­ti­nents lay their native gifts at the feet of the city of Ams­ter­dam, which holds her arms open wide to receive them.

Accord­ing to the Bosat­las, there are 232 coun­tries. Annesas Appel begins by sep­a­rat­ing each coun­try from the whole and then she copies the provinces of that coun­try very pre­cise­ly. Next, she places all the provinces one after the oth­er, in alpha­bet­i­cal order of the coun­tries to which they belong, but she leaves out the coun­tries them­selves. The provinces of Afghanistan, Alba­nia, Alge­ria, the Amer­i­can Vir­gin Islands, Andor­ra, etc. fol­low each oth­er in a long string, page after page. Each land has been giv­en a shade of green. The green tints came into being by tak­ing 25 colours from the atlas and mak­ing 232 colours via gra­di­ents. Some­times the dif­fer­ences in the green are too small to see but for­tu­nate­ly the sys­tem remains clear due to the fact that she starts count­ing again at each new coun­try: a new series of provinces of the next coun­try begins at every 1.
Appel’s atlas is not a colour­ful fan­ta­sy, but a new ver­sion of the sci­en­tif­ic Bosat­las. Every­thing is drawn to scale; it needs to be right. The Yaku­tia area of Rus­sia is immense­ly big and, how­ev­er cum­ber­some this may be, this province sets the tone for the rest of the world.
There are 12 provinces in the Nether­lands and you may think that you know what a province looks like but when they are prized apart from the whole, they are flim­sy abstract small pieces, like small crea­tures, or lit­tle pieces of moss. Amer­i­ca has angu­lar provinces, as if they were drawn using a ruler, and the Leg­end indi­cates that the Cook Islands are too small to be seen.
How nice it would be to add a list of names, just as Ptolomeus did, like a long and seduc­tive poem of exot­ic names: Badakhshan, Badghis, Bagh­lan, Balkh, Manyan, Daykun­di, Farah, Faryab, etc.

Artists love cat­e­gories, cre­at­ing order, sys­tems. It is a human trait to want to orga­nize things into cat­e­gories. Invent­ing cat­e­gories cre­ates an illu­sion that there is an over­rid­ing ratio­nale in the way that the world works.’ (Andrea Zit­tel) The artist adds some­thing, for exam­ple the doubt that strikes in the midst of exact data. We are too quick to think that a map is per­fect­ly cor­rect, that it lies with­in our reach today to make a reli­able true’ map of the world. But we also make choic­es when draw­ing a map nowa­days and every map aris­es from an inter­pre­ta­tion of the facts. A three-dimen­sion­al world is still flat­tened and this alone always means that some­thing does not cor­re­spond to real­i­ty. Appel’s atlases nib­ble away at things that are famil­iar, despite the facts being cor­rect.
She builds on the archive of mea­sures and pro­por­tions of the artist Stan­ley Brouwn. His foot­step mea­sured the world with his indi­vid­ual mea­sure. One metre, one step. The indi­vid­ual, as opposed to uni­ver­sal con­ven­tion­al measures.

In the book Mea­sur­ing the World, the writer Daniel Kehlmann con­trasts the explor­er Alexan­der von Hum­boldt with his con­tem­po­rary, the math­e­mati­cian Carl Friedrich Gauss. Both are obsessed with mea­sur­ing the world, one by fear­less­ly vis­it­ing unknown places and by test­ing and record­ing every­thing with a nev­er-flag­ging curios­i­ty. The oth­er is a com­plain­ing man who hard­ly ever leaves his home­town and uses the abstract lan­guage of the math­e­mati­cian to under­stand the world. Gauss runs ahead of what is known and imag­ines new worlds from behind his desk. Annesas Appel makes me think of Gauss, but with­out the bad tem­per. She sits bolt upright behind her com­put­er screen in order to con­struct a new ver­sion of the world with the patience of a saint, a very abstract ver­sion derived from for­mu­lae that are almost incom­pre­hen­si­ble to ordi­nary peo­ple. She devel­ops sys­tems in order to car­ry these out with the patience of a saint and with great pre­ci­sion. The repet­i­tive action is like a med­i­ta­tion. Won­der­ful! My approach is to mea­sure every­thing’, says Annesas Appel. Mea­sur­ing is know­ing, and data are the truth. An illog­i­cal, con­fus­ing, arbi­trary truth. The real­i­sa­tion of the pow­er of humans, who not only divide up the world, draw bor­ders, think up cap­i­tal cities, but also prop­a­gate the absolute­ness of these.

Annesas Appel shows the known world in a new for­mu­la, like the long line of provinces, page after page, in which mea­sure­ment and direc­tion are essen­tial. This is also a way of doing it. The world as a con­struc­tion shows the illu­sion of a truth. Our mis­takes. Our small­ness. Annesas makes the world more abstract, she takes a step back, in such a way that we no longer think of Zee­land with its pota­to fields or Fries­land with cows in the mead­ows. Instead of this, Appel makes you realise how lit­tle grip we have on our earth. It is no coin­ci­dence that she chose a map with Europe at the cen­tre. Each per­son is the point around which the earth turns. Every­one feels that his or her own fam­i­ly is very spe­cial, but if you walk along the street you will see that there is a fam­i­ly liv­ing in every house. A town full of streets, a megac­i­ty full of fam­i­lies. Hong Kong, Sao Paulo. Who are you real­ly, then? The indi­vid­ual dis­solves in the crowd; you dis­ap­pear as a per­son, as a per­son with a head full of wor­ries about triv­ial things. One metre, one step.
A sub­se­quent project is even more abstract: the start­ing point is the 188 cap­i­tal cities that are indi­cat­ed on the map of the world (Appel uses Bos’s data). The cities are allo­cat­ed the colour red.Some coun­tries do not have a cap­i­tal city: Mona­co, Vat­i­can City, Sin­ga­pore, Nau­ru, Switzer­land. But what is a cap­i­tal city, actu­al­ly? Why is it nec­es­sary? Some­times the cap­i­tal is the city where the gov­ern­ment is based, some­times the city with the most inhab­i­tants, some­times it is a polit­i­cal choice, some­times a planned city such as Brasil­ia, some­times an extreme­ly large city. There is no log­ic to it.

Small white cubes show the cap­i­tal cities. Appel draws lines from these, a line going up, a line going down, in four direc­tions. Wash­ing­ton DC gets a small white cube and cross­es show where the city is locat­ed on the merid­i­ans. Thick lines are the lines of com­mu­ni­ca­tion, like main roads between the cities, and the dot­ted lines are in fact the motor­ways that take you fur­ther away. The new scheme shows how the cap­i­tal cities relate to each oth­er, wher­ev­er they are in the world, how­ev­er close to or far away from each oth­er they are locat­ed. Parts of the world atlas become coun­try­side and space, and we read them as an intrigu­ing inter­play of lines. Appel has car­pets made of these world-street-maps, red car­pets.
This is how Annesas Appel works: You always see her renewed maps as a whole – a col­lec­tion in a book – but in a sec­ond phase, inde­pen­dent images can be tak­en from them. Antarc­ti­ca was dis­played as an inde­pen­dent work in a recent exhi­bi­tion. This extrac­tion from the col­lec­tion, and this also applies to ear­li­er projects, pro­duces images that are so strong visu­al­ly that they can stand alone. This is a recur­ring phe­nom­e­non in the work of Annesas.

De Griekse filosoof Anax­i­man­der dacht dat de aarde ton­vormig was en de mensen op het boven­ste plat­te vlak woon­den. Hij tek­ende de allereer­ste kaart van de wereld die er uit ziet als een ronde plat­te knoop met een blauwe rand, de oceaan. Drie blauwe water­stromen delen de wereld op in drie bij­na gelijke delen. De kaart lijkt op het heden­daagse logo van Mer­cedes Benz. In deze map­pa mun­di bracht Anax­i­man­der de wereld­de­len samen die in de zes­de eeuw bc. bek­end waren: Europa, Azië en Libya (een stuk van Afri­ka). Wie de geschiede­nis van de car­tografie bestudeert begri­jpt hoe lastig het is om op louter ervar­ing een kaart van de wereld te teke­nen.


Neem bijvoor­beeld de De Cata­laanse Atlas, in acht delen, uit 1375. De kaart vol­gt de route van Mar­co Polo en heeft iets van een mid­deleeuws stripver­haal waar tussen de ste­den, kaste­len en kris kras routelij­nen een kar­avaan met kame­len rond­loopt, twee naak­te man­net­jes naar par­els duiken, een bedi­ende met een kar­wats een olifant opjaagt en lege plekken gevuld zijn met tekst. Zijn boek Il Mil­ione tra­cht wel exacte data over zijn reis te geven maar het bli­jft toch gokken voor de geograaf met aan­duidin­gen als een dag reizen, een dag zeilen of twee dagen lopen. De atlas is een schit­terende ver­beeld­ing van een onbek­ende wereld.





De vorm van de aarde bleef lang onder­w­erp van wilde spec­u­laties. Plat of rond of een ovaal met pun­ten als een zep­pelin. Wiskundi­gen brak­en zich het hoofd hoe een bolle vorm ver­taald kon wor­den naar het plat­te papi­er. Al in de tweede eeuw vouwde Ptolomeus een stuk­je papyrus om een conis­che vorm heen, tek­ende daarop alles wat hij wist van de aarde en vouwde het ver­vol­gens plat. Een kaart. Ook intro­duceerde hij de meridi­aan, en lengte en breedte lij­nen en intro­duceerde een reg­is­ter van plaat­sna­men, met hun coör­di­nat­en.


Hij besefte dat richt­ing en afs­tand de kern van iedere kaart is.





Kun­ste­naars houden van kaarten, van hun sys­teem, de leg­en­da en de puzzel van het weergeven. Zij mak­en meestal een vari­ant van de echte’ kaart om hun eigen waarheid toe te voe­gen. De sur­re­al­is­ten waren geschokt door de hor­ror van de eerste werel­door­log en Paul Élu­ard her­schik­te de wereld in een kaart waarin de pure’ cul­turen van de wereld promi­nent aan­wezig waren en som­mige WO 1 lan­den nauwelijks of geen plek kre­gen.





Ook beeldend kun­ste­naar Annes­sas Appel is geob­sedeerd door kaarten en sys­te­men.


Als eerste maak­te ze een reis naar het bin­nen­ste van de com­put­er. Het uit elka­ar halen van haar note­book eindigde in vier boeken waarin ze alle onderde­len vol­gens een nieuw sys­teem onder­brengt. Laag na laag pelt ze de com­put­er af. In het eerste deel (decon­struc­tion) tekent ze ieder onderdeel secu­ur na en geeft het op papi­er dezelfde plek als waar het zich bevond in de com­put­er. Niet met de hand maar in illus­tra­tor op haar nieuwe note book. Het tweede boek (decode) laat de ver­schil­lende lagen zien. In het derde boek (writ­ing sys­tem) dansen alle onderde­len in ordenin­gen over het papi­er als de chore­ografie van een polka­dans met af en toe een pol­ka hop: lines, plat­te vlakken, imprints, cir­cles, dash­es rec­tan­gles, squares, mis­cel­la­ni­u­os. Boek vier bevat de index.


Net als de vroege kaart­mak­ers tra­cht Appel iets te viualis­eren waar we niets van begri­jpen. Het ter­ra incog­ni­ta van de com­put­er werkt net als de map­pa mun­di, het onbek­ende is in beeld gebracht, de onderde­len staan in een vri­je versvorm, maar als kijk­er zijn we nauwelijks een stap dichter bij begrip over de werk­ing of ware aard van het ding.





In View on the World Map 04 (Enti­ties 2013) brengt Appel haar ver­sie van de wereld­kaart, opnieuw in boekvorm. On line zocht ze een kaart van de wereld en voor Views on the World Map kwam ze uit op een wereld­kaart van de Bosat­las waar Europa cen­traal staat. Dit is ons zo vertrouwd dat we ons amper realis­eren dat het een keuze is, je zou ook een kaart kun­nen nemen met Jeruza­lem als uit­gangspunt, zoals de gelovi­gen deden. Of Rus­land. Annesas Appel plaatst zich in de West­erse tra­di­tie waarin ieder mens zichzelf als mid­delpunt ziet. In het fron­ton van het paleis op de Dam leggen de vier toen bek­ende wereld­de­len hun inheemse geschenken aan de voeten van de stad Ams­ter­dam die haar armen wijd opent om te ont­van­gen.


Vol­gens de Bosat­las zijn er 232 lan­den. Als eerste isoleert Annesas Appel ieder land uit het grote geheel en ver­vol­gens tekent ze heel pre­cies de provin­cies van dat land.


Daar­na zet ze alle provin­cies achter elka­ar op alfa­betis­che vol­go­rde van de lan­den waar de provin­cies bij horen, maar de lan­den zelf laat ze weg. De provin­cies van Afghanistan, Alban­ië, Alger­i­je Amerikaanse Maag­denei­lan­den, Andor­ra enz. vol­gen elka­ar op in een lange sliert, pag­i­na na pag­i­na. Ieder land heeft een kleur groen gekre­gen. De tin­ten groen ontston­den door 25 kleuren uit de atlas te nemen om via gra­di­ents te komen tot 232 kleuren. Soms zijn de ver­schillen in het groen te klein om waar te nemen maar gelukkig bli­jft het sys­teem helder door­dat ze bij ieder land opnieuw begint te tellen, bij iedere 1 begint een nieuwe reeks provin­cies van een vol­gend land.


De atlas van Appel is geen bonte fan­tasie maar een nieuwe ver­sie van de weten­schap­pelijk Bosat­las. Alles wordt op schaal getek­end, het moet klop­pen. Het deel­ge­bied Jakoetie van Rus­land is onnoemelijk groot en hoe onhandig ook, deze provin­cie geeft de maat aan voor de rest van de wereld.


Ned­er­land kent 12 provin­cies en je denkt te weten hoe een provin­cie eruit ziet maar los gepeu­terd uit het geheel zijn het prut­serige abstracte stuk­jes, als diert­jes, of stuk­jes mos. Ameri­ka kent hoekige provin­cies alsof ze met een lini­aal zijn getrokken en in de Leg­en­da is te lezen dat Cook Islands te klein is om nog te zien.


Wat zou het mooi zijn om, net als Ptolomeus, een namen­reg­is­ter toe te voe­gen, als een lang en ver­lei­delijk gedicht van exo­tis­che namen Badakhshan, Badghis, Bagh­lan, Balkh, Manyan, Daykun­di, Farah, Frayab enz.





Kun­ste­naars houden van cat­e­gorieën, van orde schep­pen, van sys­te­men. It is a human trait to want to orga­nize things into cat­e­gories. Invent­ing cat­e­gories cre­ates an illu­sion that there is an over­rid­ing ratio­nale in the way that the world works.’ (Andra Zit­tel) De kun­ste­naar voegt iets toe, bijvoor­beeld de twi­jfel die om zich heen slaat te mid­den van de exacte data. Te snel denken we dat een kaart hele­maal klopt, dat het van­daag de dag bin­nen ons bereik ligt om een betrouw­bare ware’ kaart van de wereld te mak­en. Maar ook in deze tijd mak­en we keuzes bij het teke­nen van een kaart en iedere kaart komt voort uit een inter­pre­tatie van de feit­en. Nog steeds wordt een drie dimen­sion­ale wereld plat gemaakt en alleen daar­door al klopt er alti­jd iets niet met de werke­lijkheid. De atlassen van Appel kna­gen aan het bek­ende, hoezeer de data ook klop­pen.


Ze bouwt verder aan het archief van mat­en en ver­houdin­gen van kun­ste­naar Stan­ley Brown. Zijn voet­stap mat de wereld met zijn indi­vidu­ele maat. One meter, one step. Het indi­vidu tegen­over de uni­verse­le con­ven­tionele mat­en.





In het boek Het meten van de wereld’ plaats schri­jver Daniel Kehlmann de ont­dekkingsreiziger Alexan­der Hum­boldt tegen­over zijn tijdgenoot wiskundi­ge Carl Friedrich Gauss. Bei­den zijn geob­sedeerd om de wereld op te meten, de een door onver­schrokken onbek­ende plekken te bezoeken en met een niet afla­tende nieuws­gierigheid alles uit te proberen en op te teke­nen. De ander is een klagerige man die zijn woon­plaats nauwelijks ver­laat en de abstracte taal van de wiskunde gebruikt om de wereld te begri­jpen,


Gauss loopt vooruit op het bek­ende en verzint achter zijn bureau nieuwe werelden.
Annesas Appel doet me aan Gauss denken, maar dan zon­der het slechte humeur. Kaarsrecht zit ze achter haar com­put­er scherm om met enge­len geduld een nieuwe ver­sie van de wereld te con­strueren, een hele abstracte ver­sie vanu­it voor gewone mensen bij­na onbe­gri­jpelijke for­mules. Ze ontwikkelt sys­te­men om die met enge­lengeduld en grote pre­cisie uit te voeren. De repeterende han­del­ing is als een med­i­tatie. Heer­lijk! Ik ben vooral van het meten’, zegt Annesas Appel. Meten is weten en data zijn de waarheid. Een onl­o­gis­che ver­war­rende willekeurige waarheid. Het besef van de macht van de mens die niet alleen de wereld opdeelt, gren­zen trekt, hoofd­st­e­den bedenkt maar ook de absolu­utheid daar­van propageert.





Annesas Appel toont de bek­ende wereld in een nieuwe for­mule, zoals de lange lijn van provin­cies, pag­i­na na pag­i­na, waarin maat en richt­ing essen­tieel zijn. Zo kan het dus ook. De wereld als con­struc­tie toont de illusie van een waarheid. Onze ver­gissin­gen. Onze klein­heid.


Annesas maakt de wereld abstracter, ze doet een stap achteruit, waar­door we niet meer denken aan Zee­land met zijn aar­dap­pelvelden of Fries­land met koeien in de wei. In plaats van daar­van doet Appel je besef­fen hoe weinig grip we hebben op onze aarde.


Het is geen toe­val dat ze een kaart koos met Europa als mid­delpunt. Ieder mens is de stip waarom de aarde draait. Ieder mens ervaart zijn eigen gezin als heel bij­zon­der maar loop je door de straat dan zie je dat in ieder huis een gezin leeft. Een stad vol strat­en, een miljoe­nen­stad vol gezin­nen. Hong Kong, Sao Paulo. Wie ben je dan nog? Het indi­vidu lost op in de mas­sa, als mens verd­wi­jn je, als mens met een hoofd vol zor­gen over triv­iale zak­en. One meter One Step.





Een vol­gend project is nog weer abstracter, het gaat uit van de


188 hoofd­st­e­den die genoemd wor­den op de wereld­kaart, Appel houdt zich aan de data van Bos. De ste­den is de kleur rood toebe­deeld.


Som­mige lan­den hebben geen hoofd­stad: Mona­co, Vat­i­caanstad, Sin­ga­pore Naru, Zwit­ser­land.


Maar wat is eigen­lijk een hoofd­stad, wat is de noodza­ak ervan? Soms is de hoofd­stad de stad waar de regering zetelt, soms de stad met de meeste inwon­ers, soms is het een poli­tieke keuze, soms een gep­lande stad zoals Brasil­ia, soms een extreem grote stad. Er is geen log­i­ca in te ont­dekken. De hoofd­stad van de staat New York is niet New York city maar Albany.


De hoofd­st­e­den wor­den met witte blok­je aangegeven. Van daaruit trekt Appel lij­nen, een lijn omhoog en een lijn naar bene­den, in vier richtin­gen. New York kri­jgt een wit blok­je, met kruis­jes wordt aangegeven waar de stad zich bevin­dt op de merid­i­a­nen.


Dikke lij­nen zijn de verbind­ingsli­j­nen, als hoofd­strat­en. tussen de de ste­den. De Stip­pel­li­j­nen …


Het nieuwe schema laat zien hoe de hoofd­st­e­den zich ver­houden, waar ze zich op de wereld bevin­den, hoe dicht /​ver ze van elka­ar liggen. In Rus­land Ameri­ka, Aus­tral­ië is land­schap en ruimte lezen we. Van deze wereld-stratenkaarten laat Appel tapi­jten mak­en, rode tapi­jten.





In View on the World Map 06 | Realign­ment, 2014 zet Appel opper­vlak om in lij­nen. Ze plaatst om ieder land een raster en deelt het ver­vol­gens op in stro­ken, van boven naar bene­den tast ze het land af. Haar vinger vol­gt de bergen, de ste­den, het water, de inham­met­jes, en de restru­imte om het land. Ze deelt op in water en land: aarde wordt groen en water wit. Ook de restru­imte­wordt onderdeel van de lijn. Het grote droge Aus­tral­ië trans­formeert in een con­tante lijn met weinig gat­en. Indone­sië en de Fil­ip­pi­j­nen hebben veel water en de lijn zit vol inter­rup­ties. Lan­den ver­schillen in lengte en struc­tu­ur. Appel begint met de rechterkant van de wereld­kaart, met Fuji, en vol­gt alle lan­den van rechts naar links. De pagina’s van het boek lezen van rechts naar links, van boven naar bene­den. Niets herin­nert nog aan een kaart, het doet eerder denken aan het muziek­stuk van Sime­on ten Holt. Een pon­skaart. De vorm van het land: om het ritme, de struc­tu­ur die het oplev­ert. Een mooiere manier om het­zelfde te zien.





Een kaart is inter­pre­tatie, iedere kaart is een moment opname. Annesas Appel zocht op het inter­net een kaart van Japan en kwam er achter dat iedere kaart net iets anders was getek­end. Ze legde de kaarten over elka­ar heen, vergeleek kaart 1 met kaart 2 met 3, met 4, met 5, met 6. En zo verder. De restru­imte, daar waar de kaarten niet klopten maak­te ze zwart. Het land Japan verd­ween, de fouten bleven, zwarte vorm­p­jes.


Opnieuw een rel­a­tiver­ing dat niet alles is zoals je het kri­jgt voorgeschoteld.





De mens deelt de wereld in, trekt grensli­j­nen, benoemt hoofd­st­e­den, sys­tem­a­tiseert en heerst. Weten­schap lijkt iets over de wereld te tonen maar ze creëert even­goed een waarheid. In de tijd van de ont­dekkingsreizen besefte de gebruik­er dat de kaart een sug­gestie was, een mogelijk beeld van hoe de wereld eruit zag. In onze tijd wordt ken­nis zo stel­lig gebracht, alsof er een waarheid is. Appel sluit zich aan bij de waarheid van de weten­schap, ze gebruikt hun gegevens, maar dan gaat ze verder met de data, ze lokt mensen in haar sys­teem. Appel gooit roet in de kaart van de heden­daagse car­tograaf. Zijn zek­er­heid kri­jgt een abstract jas­je. Wat vol­gt is een muziek­stuk, een dans een nieuwe vloedli­jn. Twi­jfel.











pub­lished in June 1929, in the Bel­gium Sur­re­al­ist mag­a­zine Vari­etes’